episode 12

Ask Amanda About Marketing – Episode 12: How a Legacy Brand, Well, Rebrands

Amanda Milligan 0 Comments

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Stories from childhood have taught us that transformations can be exciting! Like Cinderella going from rags to a beautiful ball gown.

fairy godmother

Nostalgia hit, anyone?

But we don’t all have fairy godmothers as fabulous as the late Mrs. Houston. The rest of us have to work hard to successfully transform a product, service, or brand. In this episode, find out how Amazon’s Alexa has worked to rebrand after being well known for its website ranking list but now offering a suite of SEO tools.

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This podcast seeks to answer your questions about content marketing and digital PR with straightforward, actionable tips. You can find all episodes here.

I’ll be publishing weekly, so subscribe to stay up-to-date, and stay tuned for special guests in the near future!

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episode 12

Episode 12: How a Legacy Brand, Well, Rebrands – Show Notes

This week’s question is:

What’s the best way to rebrand when you have a new product/service?

Mentioned Links / Additional Resources:

When an established company has to rebrand because of new offerings, messaging becomes crucial. Here’s how the marketing team at Alexa is pulling it off.

The Problem

Alexa is a brand that’s been around for 20+ years, meaning it has a lot of authority. However, originally it was known for its top sites list, a trusted compilation of all the most trafficked sites on the web.

Now, Alexa offers a suite of paid tools for competitive analysis, keyword research, and more for marketers.

So how could Alexa make it clear to anyone who might be a potential customer that they don’t only offer the ranking anymore?

I spoke with Kim Cooper and Jennifer Johnson from Alexa’s marketing team to find out.

The Solution

The key is to carefully craft the way you communicate with your established community and alter the messaging so any potential customers understand Alexa’s new value add.

Kim and Jennifer did this in multiple ways.

Content

One of their priorities is to create content that serves multiple goals. They’re a small team, so content that can be on the blog, used to train new customers, and used in the sales process would be considered a success.

For this reason, they focus on how-to content that features a problem and then a solution that involves an Alexa tool.

While they said some might consider this self-serving, it’s actually extremely valuable to their readers and is some of the most successful content they produce.

How do they see what’s working? They look at which posts get the most visits and social engagement — that’s how they know they’ve hit a topical (or format-related) nerve.

Promotion

They emphasized that it’s not enough to create the content — promoting the content is key for actually reaching relevant audiences.

First, they promote their content through some paid channels. Their most successful campaigns are run through Facebook by targeting those interested in marketing, though they have some success with LinkedIn ads, as well.

But a lot of the magic happens through their email list. Because people have signed up from their site (by seeing some content and signing up to get access to a more comprehensive piece of content), they’re already in the sales funnel and more receptive to Alexa’s message.

So their strategy is to send bite-sized value adds every week, causing email recipients to expect this value and opening the emails.

In this way, it’s almost like developing a habit, Jennifer said, and it’s a large lead driver for them.

All in all, while developing an effective content production and promotion strategy involves a significant amount of work, they advise that you always look at the big picture — don’t forget why you’re creating the content and whom it’s serving, and that’ll help lead you down the right avenues for content types and how to get that content in front of the right eyes.

Have a question you want to submit to the podcast?

Email me at [email protected] or comment below!

Have any additional insight on branding? Post it in the comments! I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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Amanda Milligan

As the Branded Content Manager for Fractl, Amanda's responsible for all on-site content, working to improve our brand engagement and enhance the agency's organic traffic growth strategy. Her work has appeared in Forbes, Content Marketing Institute, the Marketing Smarts podcast, CMO, and more. When she's not obsessing over the comma placement in blog posts, she's probably out singing karaoke or patiently waiting for "Westworld" to come back.

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